E-drawing, the moon clouds and angels wings

This week I’m trying to get back into drawing mode. You wouldn’t think it would be difficult after my holiday when I drew virtually every day. However I seem to  find it very easy to be distracted by daily life.

Angel Wings, Phil Price, 2008, exploring the interaction of wind and the structure.

Angel Wings, Phil Price, 2008, exploring the interaction of wind and the structure.

I started with a challenge, to draw the kinetic sculpture, ‘Angel Wings’, 2008, by the New Zealand artist Phil Price. OK it was a a bit of an ask to draw a sculpture that was moving in the breeze. I had my phablet with me, so I drew in Photoshop Touch. The time I spent watching the sculpture move in dips and unexpected angles around it’s gimbels was quite mesmerising.

The next day also involved drawing movement, thankfully a bit slower. In the mid morning a half moon was sitting behind a foreground of high cloud and airplane contrails. Once again I used the Photoshop Touch program to do myo drawings.

Moon cloud and contrails, 22 May 2014.

Moon cloud and contrails, 22 May 2014.

I did a second drawing as the clouds moved and the contrail dipersed.

Moon, clouds and contrail, 22 May 2014.

Moon, clouds and contrail, 22 May 2014.

Mega – soar!

Today I finally caught up with Canberra’s most controversial art work – The Skywhale. She was designed by Patricia Piccinini, one of Australia’s most recognised contemporary artists, but like the purchase of Blue Poles back in the 1970’s many were horrified that the ACT Government actually spent money (in this case $A172,000) on an artwork.

The Skywhale, in the arts precinct of Kingston, behind Megalo Print Studio and the Canberra Glassworks, 26 October 2013.

The Skywhale, in the arts precinct of Kingston, behind Megalo Print Studio and the Canberra Glassworks, 26 October 2013.

Having finally met her face to face, I’ve decided that I quite like her!

Below you can get some idea of the overall shape of the balloon, the pendulous breasts and the clawed tail.

The Skywhale,sitting in front of the Fitters Workshop, 26 October 2013.

The Skywhale,sitting in front of the Fitters Workshop, 26 October 2013.

I include this photo to help make some sense of my drawings of the Skywhale.

A 3/4 drawing of the Skywhale, 26 October 2013.

A 3/4 profile (from behind) drawing of the Skywhale, 26 October 2013.

Above you have roughly most of one side and the tail. I found the drawing difficult because even though she was tethered there was quite a bit of movement with the balloon.

The tail section of the Skywhale, 26 October 2013.

The tail section of the Skywhale, 26 October 2013.

I think drawing the seams of the balloon , in the following sketch, delivers a sense of the roundness of the inflated balloon.

Detailed view of the seams on the side of the Skywhale.

Detailed view of the seams on the side of the Skywhale.

We seem to have seen very little of the Skywhale since she first made her appearance in Canberra and  I look forward to seeing her again in the future. Alas, it appears that the Skywhale will be a transient art experience, as the Wikipedia entry on the Skywhale notes that she will have a lifespan of only some 100 flights.

Coming back down to earth

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Another speaker at the Designing a Capital forum last week was the artist Geoff Farquar-Still, whose sculpture of a paper aeroplane has come to rest not far from the coffee shop we frequent.

Geoff commented that, when this work was first placed near the High Court building, children played on it, assuming it was a piece of playground equipment. I’m not sure why the piece was moved (I do recall a sculpture competition being temporarily sited in that area), but I’m  sure that in its current location, adjacent to a children’s playground, it’s still getting similar attention. Interestingly, the surveyor working nearby had to be convinced that it was a sculpture and not just another piece of playground equipment.